Heart of Glass

EXCLUSIVE: 5 TOP TIPS on How to Write Asian or Non-White Characters and Smash the Stereotypes!

Without risk of cultural appropriation or misrepresentation or just being plain offensive.

Diversity is a buzzword we all may at some point encounter. I have written from white, mixed and Asian people’s viewpoints and can say I am fairly comfortable now. My published stories or novels have a mixture of different cultures and it is something that I grew up and am familiar with because I was born and raised trilingual in an urban environment in Johor Bahru, the industrial southern city of Malaysia. To me it is more normal and natural that everybody is unique and different than everybody looking and acting the same, eating the same food, going to the same places, speaking the same language. Writers, if you have not had the privilege of a diverse upbringing, I will give you the secret now on how to absolutely crack the code of writing your diverse characters.

1. Switch off your spell check.

This is very important. Do not proceed until you have done this. Do yourself a big favor and free yourself of all Judeo-Christian terminology, grammar, language, spelling. You will enter foreign now. Food, words, culture, syntax and they will not be underlined in red wavy lines and they will not be removed or changed by auto correct. Train yourself to always listen to real conversations, on the bus, in restaurants, on the streets, and write them down phonetically. I had listened to probably hundreds of Aunties (who are just women older than you by at least 16 years and not really aunts) which made writing the character of Auntie in my novel Heart of Glass a breeze.

‘Siu-cheh, if you wan’ lunch, I fix now.’
I stared at her. Threw my hands in the air. She knew everything.
‘What you wan’ eat?’
‘Anything.’

2. ALL culture is appropriation

We all learned it, right? Our families and our communities gave us our culture and traditions. Now find out what culture means to YOU as a writer and you do this by working with BIG themes. Jot down the themes in each culture that you know. The themes in Asian families, for example, are the 4 Fs: family, food, frugality, freedom. When you realize that many cultures including white cultures (eg Jewish, Italian, Arabic, African etc) have these very same themes, you will realize what we know and are close to is infinitely what is called the human condition, why we are here. It’s the cliched phrase which comforts writers that we are not as different as you think and that we should find the similarities in each other not the differences. Books bring people of the world together. Our job as writers is to bring the ideas which bring books together.

3. Embrace, don’t avoid stereotypes

It is the only way to challenge and smash them. For example, in Heart, I’m writing from the viewpoint of an American girl of Chinese origin, Li-an. At some point she was bound to eat Chicago hot dog, especially when Paolo suggests it to her.

‘Gimme a dog wid everythin’,’ he said. ‘Make dat two.’

At some point also, Li-an was bound to eat Chinese food. She was in Asia and she’s Asian, right? So why would that be a stereotype?

I hung up and put my feet back up again. I had jasmine rice, peppers
and fried monkfish with a coriander sauce for lunch. I played
guitar all afternoon. I wrote down melody lines and chord changes.
I wanted to be happy here, but I struggled to imagine just playing
the piano and living in a gilt cage called the pavilion.

Your reader is not interested in something ordinary or bland but the context of the detail, even if it’s a poor man’s meal like burger and chips or rice with soy sauce, it has to glitter. I especially like Crazy Poor and not Crazy Rich characters because the poor have so many more things to crave and die for. What keeps them craving for something? Your reader is interested in the finer detail of what it it means to be white, mixed, Asian or whatever, and what it means to be alive. All details will add to authenticity of the character and the voice. You can show they are poor or rich or mean or kind by the detail in the stereotype that you are challenging.

4. Practice writing a few characters

Some may work, some may not, and some may come to you easier than others. In Heart I had three main characters, Ben Mizrai, a Jewish DJ from NY, Paolo, an Italian businessman from Chicago (Chi-town, Windy City etc) and Li-an, the main character who is half Irish and half Singaporean Chinese. All have their own quirks and language. I made sure that I practiced a few times to make sure that everything that they said or did or ate was in character and not just because they were Jewish, Italian or Chinese. For your practicing, you could try a young Japanese soldier or an elderly Chinese lady. Or a pretty Chinese girl student looking for fun. These are all characters which you may find easy or hard to get into, depending on how it comes out in when you figure out what they say or do. Try on a few hats. It is just like being in a costume shop in front of a mirror.

5. Ready, SET, go

Use settings and movement between settings to inspire and arouse your imagination for the depth of your characters. For example, try a huge modern Japanese city, a tiny rural village in China, or in my case, Chicago’s Chinatown and Macau’s seedy casinos and Docklands area. Already you have a sense of the characters needs, conflicts and culture. This is because of the hybrid element in the cultures of diverse characters. As Li-an says, she is living in her fifth culture. Her first and second are Irish and Chinese as she is of mixed parentage, she has never been either countries of her parentage. She was born in Singapore – that would be her third culture, moved to Chicago – that would be her fourth, moved to Macau – that would be her fifth.

We as writers are all these places and all these things, we just turn them into stories. What all humans crave are stories, stories to inspire, to move, to teach, to entertain. If your stories work, you would also know that it would not matter what ethnicity the characters are. Bring them to life. Writing diverse Asian characters is just another way of writing an aspect of yourself, whoever you are.

Are you writing Asian characters and did you find it pretty easy or tough? As usual I would love to hear from you. All feedback and questions are welcome.

Ivy Ngeow was born and raised in Johor Bahru, Malaysia. She is of Malaysian Chinese origin and the author of two novels. Cry of the Flying Rhino (Proverse Hong Kong), winner of 2016 International Proverse Prize, is her debut set in Malaysia and Borneo. Her second novel Heart of Glass (Unbound UK) was set in Chicago and Macau. She is fond of margaritas, seafood tacos, Americana and all things vintage. She lives in London and is in her ‘third culture’.

#heartofglass #cryoftheflyingrhino Tweet me: @ivyngeow

 

 

 

 

Readings @Seksan Sat 25 August 2018 in Bangsar, Kuala Lumpur 59100

Everybody in KUALA LUMPUR.
As part of my book promo tour, I am travelling from London to make a RARE public appearance and to read from my second novel Heart of Glass in my inimitable street style. I am second or third in the running order. It’s FREE to attend.
Date: August 25, 2018    03:30PM — 06:00PM
RSVP by: August 25, 2018    12:00PM
Venue: Seksan, 67 Jalan Tempinis 1, Kuala Lumpur, 59100, Malaysia
Type: author appearance

Seksan Gallery in Bangsar is a beautiful landscape architect designed indoor outdoor space in the contemporary tropical vernacular. There will be sale of signed copies and merch. You’ll bloody love it. Take the opportunity to come and say hi to a shy and reclusive author in her own home country, the place which gave birth to and inspired her writing and her memories.

 I cannot wait to meet y’all! Please support me and my writing.
FYI I am NOT from KL.  I am an award-winning author, born and raised in Johor Bahru, Malaysia’s most dangerous city, notorious for shootings, muggings and carjackings. It’s supposed to be twinned with Hull but I think it is more befitting with Sao Paulo in South America for just general violence rating, gangs, tattoos, dyed hair and abandoned fridges.

5 Reasons I am doing Promotional Merchandise as an Author

My tour merch has arrived-arrived in time for my book launch on Saturday 30 June 2018. Not only did I write the book, I wrote thesoundtrack and shot the trailer. And now it seems, I designed, curated AND modelled my promo merch. Why? Because a) I am a grassroots person. b) I make everything if I can and c) I cannot afford to hire anyone and no one else will work for free except me. Therefore I am my own asset and commodity.

There are many reasons why I chose this form of marketing.

1. It is cost-effective

Manufacturers of promotional products keep the prices very low for mass distribution. I learned everything I needed to know from when I was doing a band, Satsuma 2005-07. The difference was that in those days there was NO social media and very limited internet. The only way to reach people was to reach people physically, with real things they will touch and hold, and real people you smile at. Prices of the gift items are low but the impact is high. You cannot afford a huge scale advertising budget. Merch is cheaper than advertising. It is cost-effective for me because I am already a designer. I can design and curate and I can source products which I may safely say, are tasteful and funky. I have been designing for more than half my life, therefore the experience is there.

2. It is instantly my brand

I designed the black and white line drawing pointed heart logo with H G monogram before I mass produced the cards on which they were printed with all my contact information. The brand is themed through my story. I am using cultural references, the period and the settings throughout my merch products. I am telling a story through these products.

3. Greater exposure of my novel and my profile as an author

My products are fun and eye-catching. A leaflet or advertising on the internet will pass before the eyes whereas a physical entity, I believe, is attractive, permanent thereby having gravitas and lasting impression on consumers. Let’s face it, readers are consumers, are we not.

4. It is my business card

Every themed product has been packaged with my contact information, thereby acting like a handmade business card.

5. Reader loyalty

I am building loyalty through merchandising because I am hoping that readers will not just read this one novel but my other future books too. I am hoping that Heart of Glass will achieve a cult following, not to mention the fact that each item has been individually packaged by yours truly in my cottage industry. This strange and unique story of branding, merch and the book itself which is deeply rooted in the 1980s reflects the obsessive, foolhardy and youthful nature of music and how it drives our passion, my passion.

2018 All rights reserved © Ivy Ngeow

Ivy Ngeow is an award-winning author living in London. Find her here. Read the latest interview here. Read a review of Heart of Glass here. Buy the eBook here, the paperbackhere.

Heart of Glass: BRAND NEW Tour Merch has arrived!

Ivy’s tour merch has arrived. Featuring the piece de resistance 1” Heart of Glass cabochon pendant and silver chain necklace.
Wrote the book, wrote the soundtrack, shot the trailer and now designed, curated and modelled the promo merch. Each item 5£. To be launched on Saturday at #booklaunch #limitededition
Look. Writing is a non profit organisation. Anything I make from these goes into buying coffee, cosmetics and printer cartridges. #myrequiredtools

OK nevermind. Just admire my cheekbones. Thank you.

INTERVIEW 10 questions: Ivy Ngeow, author of Heart of Glass with Eamonn Griffin

10 questions: Ivy Ngeow, author of Heart of Glass

As you are hopefully aware, I’m currently crowdfunding my new Lincolnshire-set thriller East of Englandthrough Unbound Publishing. And I’m not alone! So, I’ve asked a few fellow writers on Unbound’s current roster to give a quick overview of their writing work, and the book they’re crowdfunding themselves in a ten questions format.

Today’s guest is Ivy Ngeow, the author of Heart of Glass:

Ivy Ngeow.JPG

1.      Who are you and what’s your book about?

I am award-winning author Ivy Ngeow and my book Heart of Glass is a dark pacy tale about obsession, greed and music in 1980s Chicago and Macau.

2.      Why should folk read your book?

My book addresses the themes of the Reagan era which are greed and success. The protagonist is an American girl of Chinese origin. She is a young, uneducated, pretty, and naive musical genius who happens to be an immigrant to the USA. She is blinded by her desire for fame, success, love, everything. She is an antihero and this is a story of an underdog and underachiever with hopes, dreams and fantasies usually squashed by mainstream society and realities of life as an immigrant.

READ MORE HERE!

Heart of Glass: BOOK REVIEW by book blogger @LaurenKnapper of LozzysThings

 

Blank bookcover with clipping path

Ahead of publication, the FIRST official review has come in for my FIRST novel out in the UK, “Heart of Glass”. And it’s SMASHING!

“This story is a fascinating literary thriller and incredibly original. I have never read anything quite like it before.”- #bookblogger Lauren Knapper

Curious? Check out the link! Headphones not required this time.
QUOTES:

“The twists and turns in the novel leave you shocked and desperately wanting to continue reading.”

“Ngeow writes in such a talented way that you are completely immersed in the time and setting of her book.”

 

Twitter- @laurenknapper

Instagram – LozzysThings

#HeartofGlass #MadeinGreatBritain #9daystogo #bookreview #Chicago #Macau #underdog #Chinatown #1980s #disco #JamesBond #music #crime #crimenoir #noirfiction #crimefiction #thriller

Heart of Glass book trailer

Fancy some big beats? Switch on your Bluetooth speakers and do yourself a favour: check out the TRAILER I made for Heart of Glass the Novel. Music written, performed and produced by me. Film production by Satsuma Music (which is my alter ego). Hell, I even wrote the damned book.

TIP#1: you might like to grab headphones if you do not have giant speakers. It would be a crime to miss out on my killer basslines.

TIP#2 : You might like to read the book! Pre-order now, out on 30 June 2018 on AMAZON

 

Heart of Glass: Literary Criticism Cheat Sheet

Heart of Glass is a dark tale about obsession, greed and music. It is a pacy literary crime noir thriller exploring the darkness in human nature. It contains Realism, Drama, Tragedy, Horror and Gothic elements. It is loosely naturalistic as a genre, which means the narrative style is straightforward American vernacular prose about mundane things in a way seemingly devoid of sentimentality, emotional investment or attachment. It is written in first person narrative. The characters are products of their environment and their upbringing, and they behave exactly as they please i.e. badly.

The character of Li-an is inspired by the titular character in Thérèse Raquin by Emile Zola, a spoilt, immature beautiful woman who does one bad thing after another and another until she cannot stop. She is miserable from doing these things, yet she cannot stop. This is due to her naivete, selfishness, her lack of education and her greed.

Such a thing as a ‘good character’ is impossible to find in Thérèse Raquin as in Heart of Glassthere are just evil and less evil characters. In Thérèse Raquin, all characters are accomplices in some way or another of the murder of Camille, even Camille himself. As in Heart of Glass, all the characters are only concerned about themselves, their own interests. This leads them to cause crazy and intolerable situations in an endless chain of guilt-ridden activities. Survival is the main objective for each character. In Thérèse Raquin, death freed Thérèse and Laurent of their crime, and futile remorse after months of mutual hate and misbehaviour. In Heart of Glass, Paolo’s true love and forgiveness save Li-an and freed her from her obsessive and unreasonable behaviour. The other characters including Ben her accomplice and her Achilles heel, are all guilty or less guilty. Camille, Madame Raquin, Thérèse and Laurent are all victims and guilty; even secondary characters can be accused of selfishness looking just for self-satisfaction.

Emile Zola is one the finest voices in literature and one of my heroes: “I have simply done on two living bodies the kind of analysis that surgeons do on dead bodies.” He aims to strip away the usual literary polite nonsense of describing people to get at the truth of “the human mechanism”. Hence Zola writes about brutality without judgement, without contempt. As a writer what I have written about in Heart of Glass has no sermon, no moral code. The clue is in the title. Warning label: Heart of Glass may shock.

I am not attempting to pass judgement or inflict my own values. The human problem is not of God and morality. It is of the psychological condition. The reader will be coming along for the ride to experience the horrors and the brutality as my characters and I experience them. The reader is trapped inside a world of despair and desperation of the bad character, the human beast. The idea is to explore the beastly character who gets worse and worse until her heart changes what it desires. 

Which brings me to the final point: is there redemption in crime noir or crime writing? What if there is none? What if there is no solution to evil, no Jesus, no Buddha, no saints in this story, only sinners?

Painting: Sobbing Woman in Bed by Edward Munch.